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Can’t get enough of @smartmuseum 
#vsco #chicago

Can’t get enough of @smartmuseum
#vsco #chicago

We really want to get rid of these [tanks]. We’ve been trying to get the military to take them back since 2004.

Chelan County Sheriff’s Department’s Undersheriff John Wisemore, as quoted in "Police Want to Get Rid of Their Pentagon-Issued Combat Gear. Here’s Why They Can’t."

In the past eight years, the Pentagon grant program has loaned local law enforcement some 200,000 ammunition magazines, 94,000 machine guns, and thousands of armored vehicles, aircraft, land mine detectors, silencers, and grenade launchers—all at the request of the local agencies themselves. But images of the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, of police in military gear cracking down on peaceful protesters, have turned many communities against a program critics say has eroded the line between police officers and soldiers. […]

Even before police militarization made the news, hundreds of police departments were finding that grenade launchers, military firearms, and armored vehicles aren’t very useful to community policing. When Chelan County police officers requested one armored car in 2000—the request that landed them three tanks—they pictured a vehicle that could withstand bullets, not land mines. Law enforcement agencies across the country have quietly returned more than 6,000 unwanted or unusable items to the Pentagon in the last 10 years, according to Defense Department data provided toMother Jones by a spokeswoman for Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), who has spearheaded a Senate investigation of the Pentagon program that is arming local police. Thousands more unwanted items have been transferred to other police departments.

But some agencies have found the process of getting rid of unwanted military gear next to impossible. Agencies can’t return or trade equipment without Defense Department approval, and because the Pentagon technically still owns the equipment, they can’t sell it.

According to interviews with state officials running point between the Pentagon and police, the Defense Department prefers to leave equipment in circulation whenever possible. “It’s a low-cost storage method for them,” says Robb Davis, the mayor pro tem of Davis. His town is trying to shake its MRAP. “They’re dumping these vehicles on us and saying, ‘Hey, these are still ours, but you have to maintain them for us.’”

(via hipsterlibertarian)
politicalprof:

Not everything in this is true, but it gets to the essence of the problem. From the Daily Mail.

politicalprof:

Not everything in this is true, but it gets to the essence of the problem. From the Daily Mail.

(via hipsterlibertarian)

themellowroom:

Organism // Tommy Guerrero

treakiepop:

Sonic Youth - Beauty Lies In The Eye (Live 1987 VPRO Session) (by SonicYouthTV)

➜ Seattle is about to start fining people for throwing away too much food

hipsterlibertarian:

The Seattle City Council passed a new ordinance Monday that could mean $1 fines for people who toss too many table scraps into the trash. […]

Under the new rules, collectors can take a cursory look each time they dump trash into a garbage truck.

If they see compostable items make up 10 percent or more of the trash, they’ll enter the violation into a computer system their trucks already carry, and will leave a ticket on the garbage bin that says to expect a $1 fine on the next garbage bill.

Composting and not wasting food are obviously good things, but:

1. Kinda creepy. Obviously there’s not really a reasonable expectation of privacy with garbage, but we also don’t expect the garbage collectors to be actively rooting through our trash. Especially if you’re tossing medical stuff, like empty prescription bottles.

2. It’s difficult to imagine that this won’t eventually be abused. Trash can tell you a lot about someone’s life. In our “see something, say something” society, the garbage men may become de facto, warrant-free eyes and ears for the police department. Pot is legal in Seattle, but other drugs aren’t, and it’s especially easy to see how this policy could be a boon to the drug war. 

3. 10% could be awfully subjective. A dollar fined here and there can add up for a city budget, and there will be no real way to contest these fines. The fines will be based entirely on the garbage collector’s very quick estimation, and by the time the citizen finds out, their trash will be long gone. Even if the trash collectors estimate honestly to the best of their abilities, it seems naive to think that people won’t get fined unfairly.

4. If our garbage is up for review, what next? The crux of the issue here is not whether people should be responsible and frugal with their food and food waste. I think everyone pretty much agrees with that, even if they don’t necessarily practice it. Indeed, there are a lot of good things to do which we don’t let the government mandate, because we understand that adults should be able to make their own decisions. But if our trash is fair game for government review, what other surveillance powers might the government claim to make us “better” people?

breakingnews:

Attorney General Eric Holder to resign
NPR: US Attorney General Eric Holder will announce his resignation later today.
A Justice Department official later confirmed the report. Holder will reportedly leave the department as soon as his successor is confirmed.
Photo: Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP via NPR

Dude is grabbing his coat and dipping; pcing out for real.

breakingnews:

Attorney General Eric Holder to resign

NPR: US Attorney General Eric Holder will announce his resignation later today.

A Justice Department official later confirmed the report. Holder will reportedly leave the department as soon as his successor is confirmed.

Photo: Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP via NPR

Dude is grabbing his coat and dipping; pcing out for real.

(via eat-pray-thug)

mishakhophoto:

some guy with gum on his elbow
mid summer, 2014

mishakhophoto:

some guy with gum on his elbow

mid summer, 2014

(via rrroseselavy)